Lora Abernathy: Seize the day … by going to sleep

With spring in the air and the sunshine’s light showering us earlier in the morning and later into the night, I have already started enjoying one of my favorite warm-weather pastimes: sunny Sunday afternoon naps.

Yes, sleeping is one of my favorite things to do. I work hard and play hard; I’m going to sleep hard.

I have never embraced the saying, “You can sleep when you’re dead.” Sleeping is fun! Why would anyone dismiss it as an activity worthy of only death’s preoccupation? Balderdash!

Moreover, I believe going full force every waking minute means you can’t savor those moments and experience them to their fullest if you haven’t rested. The experts agree. At least once a week, a health professional is a guest on a daytime TV talk show discussing the health benefits of sleep — lowered blood pressure, increased metabolism, stronger immune system.

Additionally, I fall asleep within two minutes of my head hitting the pillow and I then sleep very deeply, with restlessness only rarely a source of trouble. I am the opposite of my husband, Gary.

He was having trouble sleeping the other night and decided to vacuum at 1:30 a.m. One of the loudest machines in any household was running strong in the middle of the night and I didn’t even hear it.

One summer, I was traveling with a group of people overseas and the guys in our group serenaded us girls below our windows one night. It was a really sweet, memorable evening … or so I was told the next day. I’d slept through it all. At the end of that two-month trip, we gave each other a superlative. Mine was “Most Likely To Be In Bed Before 9 p.m.”

Abraham Lincoln said it best, “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.”

You don’t miss out on life when you sleep; you obtain a better life when you do. Sleeping is a great way to sharpen your axe.

As much as I love going to sleep at night, there is something special about the midday nap, the bright sun shining in through the window, the leaves on the giant maple tree gently rustling outside. It’s my own way of slowing down a world that moves too fast.

Whether a midday nap or an hour earlier into bed, my hope this spring is that you let a little more slumber in your life. If you don’t think you can do it, try harder — and if worse comes to worse, sleep on it.

Salt Magazine